Legal Tender

Are both the first polymer and the new polymer series legal tender?

All existing Australian banknotes are legal tender. During the transition period, banknotes from both series can continue to be used and will be in circulation for a number of years.

How can I obtain value for my old Australian banknotes?

All previous issues of Australian banknotes retain their legal tender status. However, it is a long time since some of these banknotes actively circulated in Australia and many retailers and members of the public may be reluctant to accept them if they are not familiar with the designs and may suspect them to be counterfeit.

The Reserve Bank, and most commercial banks, will redeem old Australian banknotes at face value. If you take your old banknotes to a commercial bank they may exchange them for current banknotes. Please bear in mind that a commercial bank may require time to confirm that a banknote from a previous banknote series is genuine or may need to send such banknotes to the Reserve Bank for confirmation. Alternatively, you can exchange your old banknotes for current banknotes at the Sydney Head Office or Canberra branch.

Who makes Australia's coins?

The Royal Australian Mint in Canberra is responsible for the production of Australia's circulating coins.

Is the Reserve Bank withdrawing the $100 banknote from circulation?

At this stage there are no plans to withdraw the $100 banknote or make any other change to the denominational mix of Australian banknotes.